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Mr. Do Offline OP
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Asking here, because I trust recommendations of this group...

Currently have an LG 43-UN700B for work laptop, home PC, and XBox.

Was looking at upgrading to something that will look nicer for working in Photoshop for artwork, XBox, etc.

Went with the ASUS PG42UQ... then it arrived damaged, so sent back for an exchange, but they were out, so I ended up getting a refund... I'm kinda taking that as a sign.

Was thinking LG 48GQ900-B originally... and am thinking about it again... but I keep seeing differing opinions in PC text quality with an OLED monitor... I don't want to sacrifice that for prettier pictures... but then I also have seen that having G-Sync is good for MAME?

Anyway... looking for opinions if anyone here has used an OLED monitor for daily work or MAME coding, and what you think about it... much appreciated!


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I don't have an OLED PC monitor, but I have an HTPC connected to my LG C1 77" OLED. I mostly use it for media playback, but occasionally MAME. Text on it looks really nice, but I don't use it for normal PC usage.

When it comes to Gsync/Freesync, It's very nice for MAME cause it can match most any refresh rate used by an emulated system. Perfectly smooth Pacman 60.6Hz, and ~53Hz for Midway Y/T unit stuff like Mortal Kombat.

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OLED is infamous for suffering of burn-in. So if you really intend to use the monitor for photo editing with exact calibrated extreme quality colour rendering, better do not use it for other things because they degrade so rapidly.

Well, my about 20 years old SGI Tritnitron here on my main PC also has plenty of burn-in (titlebar and taskbar area in strongly different colour etc., and red channel intensity changes randomly by shaky contacts inside the tube), although likely less worn than most old arcade CRTs.

Last edited by =CO=Windler; 10/26/22 04:48 AM.

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Originally Posted by =CO=Windler
OLED is infamous for suffering of burn-in.

You're infamous for spouting ignorance based on archaic knowledge that was applicable years ago but not in modernity. Go rant about TEMPEST some more.

Burn-in was an issue with really early OLED panels. Over the years it's gotten to the point where it's ostensibly a non-issue, to the point that various organizations that review display devices are now flatly refuting such claims, e.g. https://www.whathifi.com/advice/ole...ried-about-it-and-how-can-you-prevent-it

The current situation is that while burn-in on OLED panels can occur, it's rare. I can confirm this rarity; I've used an OLED TV from Philips as my primary PC monitor for over a year at this point, with it on anywhere from 8 to 16 hours a day, and there's no burn-in regardless of what gray level I do a full-screen fill with - I just checked.

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FWIW Mr. Do, Samsung is due out w/ a 34" Odyssey OLED Q4 they announced a while back. It's got great specs.
https://news.samsung.com/global/sam...yssey-oled-g8-gaming-monitor-at-ifa-2022

I'm keeping an eye on it for my new main monitor as I *love* the OLED Sony A80J TV I got last year, which with Freesync now can play MAME properly.

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Originally Posted by Just Desserts
Burn-in was an issue with really early OLED panels. Over the years it's gotten to the point where it's ostensibly a non-issue, to the point that various organizations that review display devices are now flatly refuting such claims, e.g. https://www.whathifi.com/advice/ole...ried-about-it-and-how-can-you-prevent-it

https://www.whathifi.com/advice/ole...ried-about-it-and-how-can-you-prevent-it

Quote
One last rather drastic feature OLED TVs provide to address potential screen burn issues is Panel or Pixel Refreshing. This feature essentially attempts to equalise the ‘wear’ on the organic elements in the picture so that no specific parts of the image age faster than the rest.

On LG OLED TVs the feature has short term and long term elements. The short term one sees your LG TV running a pixel refresh that takes around 10 minutes when you turn the TV into standby after running it for more than four uninterrupted hours. You won’t even know that this process is taking place.

The long term LG pixel refresher kicks in every 2000 hours of use, and involves a much longer ‘equalisation’ process that takes up to an hour to complete. Here the user will get a message that the refresh system is about to run, and see a white horizontal line on screen when the process is almost finished.
...
Another very important thing OLED TV users can do to improve the longevity of their TVs is to turn them into standby rather than always turning them fully off at the plug. This may not sound ideal in these days of soaring energy bills, but the simple fact is that, as noted in the previous section, OLED TVs tend to run short screen maintenance procedures when on standby that obviously can’t be triggered if the screen has had all of its power removed.

This makes OLED TV not only a huge energy hog in standby (cleverly cheating against energy saving laws) but a big EMF and security risk because discouraging the user from using a switchable socket for true off mode permits it to irradiate your home with wifi (which transmitter refuses to be turned off through user menus) and keeps backdoors open to spy the mankind by its manufacturer and their nation's intelligence agencies they are enforced to obey. The more expensive a device is sold as luxury, the more likely it may be rated a worthy target for economic espionage (to eavesdrop discussions about yet unpatented new inventions etc.) by being expected to end in the hands of wealthy managers etc., which makes highend TVs a more effective cuckoo's egg than cheapo stuff found in every household. Hence in the age after Edward Snowden any expensive device that is designed such that the owner is warned not to circumvent its standby mode by a switchable power strip needs to be rated highly suspicious.

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It’s worth bearing in mind, though, that Sony’s advice on its own Panel Refresh feature is that running it ‘may affect the panel. [So] as a reference… do not perform it more than once a year, as it may affect the usable life of the panel’. So we would join Sony in strongly advising that you only use this manual application of pixel/panel refreshing very sparingly indeed – maybe even only when you think you might be seeing the earliest stages of a screen burn issue.

Outch! This sentence contradicts the above advice and strongly hints that it is an obsolescence feature designed to reduce the useful lifespan in favour for making it solely look good during warranty period (much like the "colour return" self-calibration mode of Trinitron CRT monitors, those increased voltages until black turned very pale and looking washed out, because the algorithm failed to properly measure the behaviour of aged CRTs and so misaligns them worse and worse). OLED is a shortlived product designed to look great only so long the device is new.

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As well as providing various features to help prevent OLED burn in, TV manufacturers provide guidance to OLED TV owners about how to use their sets. In particular, you’re advised that you should avoid displaying images that may cause image retention. As in, images with bright static elements...

like any kinds of videogames containing score display and so on at fixed position - particularly involving all classic non-scroll 2D games, but basically also any PC desktop if sufficiently bright. They may have awesome low latency if properly designed (still nothing beats CRT), but are not built to last.

https://www.displayninja.com/oled-screen-burn-in/

I still remember when the first plasma flatscreens for each 3000€ (30'' 16:9 or such) came out, the main station of Bremen (German city) installed them indoors above exits to the departure platforms as the newest stylish way of displaying train timetables (as text in mainly white on dark blue, replacing 19'' 4:3 monochrome CRTs). After half a year they all were burned in such badly that the phosphor turned black where the white text had been and became barely readable, and after another half year all these defunct panels had been removed.

Last edited by =CO=Windler; 10/27/22 03:53 AM.

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https://www.eurogamer.net/nintendo-switch-oled-screen-undergoes-3600-hour-burn-in-test

3600 hours on a still image, only *slight* burnin. And the switch doesn't really do any anti-burn in techniques.

I've had my OLED for 1.5 years, and not even a hint of burnin, and use an nvidia shield TV unit, so lots of static images.

Modern OLED is way more resistant than early ones. It's way less of an issue these days. Newer LG's often come with a 5 year burnin replacement warranty.

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It certainly also depends on what lifespan is nowadays expected for electronics. IMO hardware must survive minimum 15 years to be acceptable for reducing pollution. The Toshiba TV I am running here is late 1980th (well, one of the most basic cheap 15'' colour CRT models) with burn-in of the nowadays unsightly letterbox 16:9 bars barely visible on fullscreen 4:3 pictures. The 12'' TFT of my IBM 760XD laptop of 1996 has a confetti storm of dead pixels near its screen borders, but in that era LCD screen development was still somewhat in its infancy.

Last edited by =CO=Windler; 10/27/22 04:15 AM.

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Hi Co-Windler... thank you...

I've been pretty good at researching stuff on the Internet for a while now... I'm aware of all of the stuff that you posted above.

Reason I posted the question here, is I'm specifically looking for the opinion of some the regulars that hang out here, that might have real-world experience using recent OLED displays.

So far, it looks like Reznor and Ryan are happy.

To JohnIV... looks cool... but I've had a 42" monitor for over two years now... I don't think I could go back down to a smaller display.


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Of course you can buy an OLED screen and get happy with it. But using it as colour reference monitor for photo/video mastering AND your daily gaming device is not recommended because colour quality degrades quickly by burn-in. Get a separate monitor for picture editing if you want OLED for low latency gaming.

Recently I saw in a sales prospect here in Germany an OLED TV for 799€, thus they stop being excessively moonpriced luxury items. But IMO it is rather because consumers begin to understand that they don't last and (unlike advertized) do not consume less energy than TFT (when not falling for forged EU standard test but regarding the total consumption including the anti-burn-in cycles during "standby").


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